ACACIA EHRENBERGIANA PDF

Common names: shoestring acacia My notes: Grows only in the city. Extract from Wikipedia article : Acacia stenophylla, the Shoestring acacia, is an evergreen tree in the family Fabaceae native to Australia Shoestring acacia Acacia stenophylla in West Bay, in Onaiza area. Doha, Qatar, May 3, Mimosa tortilis Common names: samar, Samr, samur, Umbrella Thorn Extract from Wikipedia article : Vachellia tortilis, widely known as Acacia tortilis but attributed by APG III to the Vachellia genus, is the umbrella thorn acacia, also known as umbrella thorn and Israeli babool, a medium to large canopied tree native primarily to the savanna and Sahel of Africa especially Sudan , but also occurring in the Middle East. Shoot of Umbrella Thorn Acacia tortilis in Trainah gardens.

Author:Taushakar Tahn
Country:Sao Tome and Principe
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Medical
Published (Last):7 May 2011
Pages:362
PDF File Size:19.99 Mb
ePub File Size:1.26 Mb
ISBN:817-9-96740-495-7
Downloads:86386
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Tygora



A Abdalla1 Izeldin A. Babiker2 Kamal F. Therefore, local inhabitants largely depend on some tree species suitable for grazing purposes. In the present study, the nutritional value for fruits of Acacia ehrenbergiana Salam seeds and pods at the lower Atbra river basin in north eastern part of Sudan was investigated. Field samples of fruits were collected, each sample kept separately in a small cloth kit. Chemical analysis of fruit samples was conducted to quantify the content of various nutritional attributes including: the crude protein, crude fibers, fats, starch, ash, and moisture content.

Chemical analysis revealed that CP is found to be as high as These values showed the high nutritional values fruits. Similarly mineral contents demonstrate good amounts of Na and Ca that needed by livestock for adequate growth, but lower amounts of P that should be supplemented to the diets.

Most tested browse fruits revealed adequate nutritional values of Acacia ehrenbergiana Salam fruits as a protein or dry season supplement. Fodder trees still need to be fully evaluated in order to reduce the cost of feed. This can be done by being used as a feed supplement to livestock.

Increasing the base for feed options forages with high quality feed will support the ever increasing demand for livestock products ,as feed is the most important factor influencing livestock production in the harsh environment of the dry lands. All Rights Reserved. Keywords: Fodder analysis, Acacia, Nutritional value. Small holder livestock keepers in this part of Sudan, rarely use conventional concentrate feeds in livestock production system as they are expensive.

Non- conventional feeds need to be considered for this sector and areas [2]. Camel and goats depend largely on natural range lands for their feed requirements, a situation unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. Tropical rangeland is endowed with flora that is rich in protein.

Most range lands in Sudan are dominated by Acacia species beside other fodder tree species. In The dry season period in Sudan, livestock experience serious shortage of feed, which in turn causes pressure on the range lands, resulting in degradation. The nutritional inadequacy of the dry season grazing imposes a major constraint on sustainable livestock production under traditional systems where grazing constitutes the only source of feed for livestock.

The non-availability of forage during the dry season affects sedentary livestock more, as they lack the advantage of mobility exercised in the transhumant and nomadic systems. The utilization of protein rich fodder trees as feed supplement can counter the seasonal shortage of good quality forage for livestock.

Acacia ehrenbergiana has a wide distribution range at present. It is an important legume fodder treefor indigenous populations it is used to feed animals, such as goats, sheep and camels. It is a valued fodder leaves, flowers and seed pods for camels, sheep and goats in the Sahelian regions, where it is pollarded in the dry season.

The role of fodder trees and shrubs Acacia, Cadaba, Maeruaetc as a dry season source of feed pods, leaves and twigs should not be under- estimated. They are particularly valuable in the Semi-desert and Low Rainfall Savanna zones.

He concluded that, the potential nutritive value of Acacia ehrenbergiana when comparable to the other browsers is rich in most minerals. FadelElSeed, et al. Mineral concentration ofAcacia ehrenbergiana was found to be of relatively higher Ca content as reported by [], but with extremely low P content.

The objective of this study was to assess the chemical analysis and potential nutritive value of some selected species of Acacia ehrenbergiana fruits pods and seeds in Lower Atbara River area, based on their chemical composition. Samples Collection Acaciaehrenbergiana Salam grown along the downstream of Atbara Riverbank, Sudan, as the most desirable sites bygrazers, was examined.

These were immediately weighed and stored in cloth bags. Samples were identified and labeled with botanical and local names. Laboratory Sample Preparation Fruit samples were sun dried and their moisture contents were calculated. The dry samples were ground, burned to ash and treated with HCl and HNO 3 acid in order to digest any residues of organic matter.

The samples were filtered for chemical analysis [7]. Potassium and sodium were analyzed by flame-photometer Coring EEL while calcium, magnesium, iron and copper were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer Perkin Elmer and phosphorus was determined by the spectrophotometer SP Unican. This is due to that, in this study the whole fruit pods and seeds was involved in the chemical analysis, but both of them is higher than protein content of the shoots and forage of the same fodder tree. Again, Walker [9] reported that the crude protein content of browse plants is generally considerably higher than that for the grasses at all times other than the early growing season.

The crude fiber CF content in the present study Minerals content of Acacia ehrenbergiana fruits shown on table 2 is consistent with what had been reported by [] and slightly lower than those reported by El- Behairy [3] as.

It showed adequate Ca concentration, but with extremely low P content. Its strongly recommended to supplement using an appropriate amount of phosphorus. Mineral composition of fruits of commonly grazed species in the study area Mineral concentration Ca 0. CONCLUSION Fodder trees fruits pods and seeds provide a considerable part of animal demand for protein and macro- minerals to overcome the negative impact of the dry season as shown in our findings.

Efficient utilization of the available feed resources is a key factor in livestock production that may improve livelihood of resource - poor communities and increase opportunities for the provision of animal protein in the forms of meat and milk. Cheap protein sources will be a prerequisite for viable and sustainable animal production in the dry lands of Sudan.

Abdalla, I. Babiker, J. Al-Brahim, A. Mohammed, M. El-Kordufani, and M. Elobeid, "Potential of prosopischilensis Molina stuntz as a non-conventional animal feed in the dry lands of Sudan," International Journal of Plant, Animal and Environmental Sciences, vol. Smith, E. Owen, I. Mueller- Hrvey, J. Sikosana, and V. Mlambo, "Incresing the productivity of small holder owned goats through supplementation with terr fruits," in Proceedings of the British Society of Animal Science York, , p.

FadelElSeed, A. Amin, K. Abdel Ati, J. Sekine, M. Hishinuma, and K. Hmana, "Nutritive evaluation of some fodder tree species during the dry season in central Sudan," Ausian- Aust J. Abdulrazak, A.

Fujihara, J. Ondeik, and R. Orskov, "Nutritive value of some acacia tree leaves from Kenya," Anim. Feed Sci. Aganga, T. Adogla-Bessa, U. Omphile, and K. Tshirelesto, "Significance of browses in the nutrition of tswana goats," Archivos De Zootecnia, vol. Jones, Laboratory guide for conducting soil tests and plant analysis.

Naumann and R. Bassler, "Diechemische untersuchung von futtermittenbuch Bd. Walker, A review of browse and its role in livestock in Africa. Production in Southern Africa. In: Le Houerou, H.

Browse in Africa. The current state of knowledge vol. Views and opinions expressed in this article are the views and opinions of the authors, Animal Review shall not be responsible or answerable for any loss, damage or liability etc.

ARTIFICIOS MATEMATICOS PDF

Celtis ehrenbergiana – Spiny Hackberry

A Abdalla1 Izeldin A. Babiker2 Kamal F. Therefore, local inhabitants largely depend on some tree species suitable for grazing purposes. In the present study, the nutritional value for fruits of Acacia ehrenbergiana Salam seeds and pods at the lower Atbra river basin in north eastern part of Sudan was investigated. Field samples of fruits were collected, each sample kept separately in a small cloth kit. Chemical analysis of fruit samples was conducted to quantify the content of various nutritional attributes including: the crude protein, crude fibers, fats, starch, ash, and moisture content. Chemical analysis revealed that CP is found to be as high as

IDIOTA DOSTOJEWSKI PDF

Vachellia flava

Shaktikree Acacia ehrenbergiana Hayne [2]. Citation in scholarly articles. Volume 3, Families J—L. Email this to a friend Print Share on facebook Tweet this. There are citation in web searches related to Acacia ehrenbergiana Hayne.

DIGITECH RP3 MANUAL PDF

Acacia Seeds

Description A list of plants under threat and facing possible extinction, usually with brief details of the threats and information on habitat. Propagation The seed of most, if not all, members of this genus has a hard seedcoat and may benefit from scarification before sowing to speed up germination. This can usually be done by pouring a small amount of nearly boiling water on the seeds being careful not to cook them! By this time they should have imbibed moisture and swollen - if they have not, then carefully make a nick in the seedcoat being careful not to damage the embryo and soak for a further 12 hours before sowing.

Related Articles