GEORGES FLOROVSKY PDF

Such questions come into particularly stark relief in the recent polemic of the late Russian philologist Mikhail Gasparov against the scholarly legacy of Mikhail Bakhtin. By emphasizing the optimistic values of dialogue and co-creativity with the authors of great literature, Bakhtin offers an appealing alternative to the drab view of literary studies as a hermetic discipline, and his work has exerted a powerful influence on scholars of literature and culture across much of the world. For his part, Gasparov distinguished himself as one of the great Russian literary scholars of the twentieth century, and his writings on methodology offer not only a searing criticism of Bakhtin, but an impassioned defense of a traditional philological approach that challenges many current orthodoxies of U. This seminar led by Caryl Emerson and Michael Wachtel will take this conflict between two giants of Russian literary scholarship as a point of departure for examining larger questions of the tasks of the literary scholar and the future of the field. To attend the seminar.

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Inspired by the erudite environment in which he grew up, he learned English, German, French, Latin, Greek, and Hebrew while still a schoolboy. At eighteen, he started to study philosophy and history. After his first graduation, he taught for three years at high schools in Odessa and then made his full graduation including the licensia docendi at all universities in the Russian empire.

In , he began to teach at the University of Odessa, but his family was forced to leave Russia in In the s, he had a close personal and vocational friendship with Berdyaev. In , Florovsky was appointed professor for patristics at the St.

Sergius Orthodox Theological Institute in Paris. In this subject, he found his real vocation. Patristics became for him the benchmark for Orthodox theology and exegesis , as well as a source for many of his contributions and critiques of the ecumenical movement. Despite not having earned an academic degree in theology apart from several honorary degrees he was awarded later , Florovsky would spend the rest of his life teaching at theological institutions.

In , Florovsky was ordained to the priesthood. During the s, he undertook extensive researches in European libraries and wrote his most important works in the area of patristics as well as his magnum opus, Ways of Russian Theology.

In this massive work, he questioned the Western influences of scholasticism, pietism, and idealism on Russian theology and called for a re-evaluation of Russian theology in the light of patristic writings.

Among the critics were Bulgakov, the head of the St. Sergius Institute and prominent exponent of the Russian theological tradition of the 19th century, as well as Berdyaev, exponent of the religious renaissance of the 20th century. In Florovsky was asked by his synod overseers to "lay down the deanship. He died in Quotations "Orthodoxy is summoned to witness. In this newly sought Orthodox synthesis, the centuries-old experience of the Catholic West must be studied and diagnosed by Orthodox theology with greater care and sympathy than has been the case up to now… The Orthodox theologian must also offer his own testimony to this world—a testimony arising from the inner memory of the Church—and resolve the question with his historical findings.

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Inspired by the erudite environment in which he grew up, he learned English, German, French, Latin, Greek, and Hebrew while still a schoolboy. At eighteen, he started to study philosophy and history. After his first graduation, he taught for three years at high schools in Odessa and then made his full graduation including the licensia docendi at all universities in the Russian empire. At that time, he realized that there would be no return for him, since the history and philosophy he taught was incompatible with Marxist ideology and would be rejected. In , Florovsky was appointed professor for patristics at the St.

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Archpriest Georges Florovsky

Inspired by the erudite environment in which he grew up, he learned English, German, French, Latin, Greek, and Hebrew while still a schoolboy. At eighteen, he started to study philosophy and history. After his first graduation, he taught for three years at high schools in Odessa and then made his full graduation including the licensia docendi at all universities in the Russian empire. In , he began to teach at the University of Odessa, but his family was forced to leave Russia in

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Georges Florovsky

Raised in an erudite environment, he learned English , German , French , Latin , Greek , and Hebrew while a schoolboy, and at eighteen he started to study philosophy and history. He graduated from the University of Odessa in After his first graduation he taught for three years at high schools in Odessa , and then made his full graduation including the licentia docendi at all universities in the Russian empire. In Florovsky began to teach at the University of Odessa ; but in his family was forced to leave Russia. Florovsky realized at that time that there would be no return for him, because Marxism did not accept the history and philosophy he taught. In Florovsky received his M.

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