LAMENTATIONS RABBAH PDF

The designation "Rabbati" derives apparently from the verse: "How doth the city sit solitary, that was full of rabbati people" Lam. The Structure Lamentations Rabbah is an exegetical Midrash which expounds the Book of Lamentations verse by verse, and sometimes word by word. It is a compilation of various expositions and aggadot. The work is divided into five sections, corresponding to the chapters of the Book of Lamentations. These are of the classical type of proem found in amoraic Midrashim, introduced by an extraneous verse which is subsequently connected with the beginning of the Book of Lamentations. In 20 proems the extraneous verse is taken from the Prophets 10 from Jeremiah , in 13 it comes from the Hagiographa 2 from the Book of Lamentations itself , and only in 3 is the extraneous verse from the Pentateuch.

Author:Zolor Mami
Country:Chile
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Video
Published (Last):27 January 2015
Pages:218
PDF File Size:11.49 Mb
ePub File Size:10.26 Mb
ISBN:431-4-96508-999-3
Downloads:91995
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Malagami



The designation "Rabbati" derives apparently from the verse: "How doth the city sit solitary, that was full of rabbati people" Lam. The Structure Lamentations Rabbah is an exegetical Midrash which expounds the Book of Lamentations verse by verse, and sometimes word by word.

It is a compilation of various expositions and aggadot. The work is divided into five sections, corresponding to the chapters of the Book of Lamentations. These are of the classical type of proem found in amoraic Midrashim, introduced by an extraneous verse which is subsequently connected with the beginning of the Book of Lamentations.

In 20 proems the extraneous verse is taken from the Prophets 10 from Jeremiah , in 13 it comes from the Hagiographa 2 from the Book of Lamentations itself , and only in 3 is the extraneous verse from the Pentateuch. Nearly all begin with the name of a sage an amora , and are grouped according to the number of expositions given by him in diminishing order: first come the proems of the sages in whose name begin four, then three, then two, and finally one, proem.

The Midrash contains many aggadot and homilies on the destruction of the Temple and the sorrows of subjugation and exile. The Midrash also contains many aggadot on the Bar Kokhba revolt The Midrash also includes many Greek words, as also a complete sentence in Latin: vive domine imperator "Long live my lord the emperor"; The Date of its Redaction Except for some later additions, the entire Midrash, including the proems, is a compilation redacted by a single redactor.

No sage later than the fourth century c. The list of kingdoms that subjugated the Jewish people concludes with "Edom Seir," i.

It is explicitly mentioned for the first time only in R. In addition to availing himself of popular aggadot, the redactor made extensive use of homilies delivered in synagogues on the Ninth of Av.

The scarcity of comforting aggadot is thus explained not only by the character of Lamentations but also by the prohibition of delivering comforting homilies on the Ninth of Av. Editions The work was first published at Pesaro in together with the Midrashim on the other four scrolls Song of Songs , Ruth, Ecclesiastes, Esther , although they are not homogenous.

This edition became the basis of the many subsequent ones. In S. Despite its defects and inaccuracies it represented at the time a considerable advance. Most of the manuscripts of the Midrash have not thus far been utilized. Hasan-Rokem, in: Tarbiz, —2 , —31; Z. Rabinowitz, Ginze Midrash , —

LINKSYS RE2000 PDF

Eichah - Lamentations - Chapter 2

It begins with 36 consecutive proems forming a separate collection, certainly made by the author of the Midrash. They constitute more than one-fourth of the work 47bb in the Venice ed. These proems and, perhaps, most of the annotations, which are arranged in the sequence of the verses 52cb , originated in the discourses of which, in olden times, the Book of Lamentations had been the subject. The haggadic explanation of this book—which is a dirge on the fall of the Jewish state and the extinction of the national splendor—was treated by scholars as especially appropriate to the Ninth of Ab , to the day of the destruction of the Temple, and to the eve of that fast-day comp. Contents [ show ] The Proems The sources from which Yerushalmi drew must have been accessible to the author of Eichah Rabbah, which was certainly edited some time after the completion of the former, and which probably borrowed from it. The haggadic comment on Hosea vi. Buber , p.

BFW92 DATASHEET PDF

Lamentations Rabbah

It begins with 36 consecutive proems forming a separate collection, certainly made by the author of the Midrash. They constitute more than one-fourth of the work 47bb in the Venice ed. These proems and, perhaps, most of the annotations, which are arranged in the sequence of the verses 52cb , originated in the discourses of which, in olden times, the Book of Lamentations had been the subject. The haggadic explanation of this book—which is a dirge on the destruction of the first and second Temples in Jerusalem and the national destruction that came along with it—was treated by scholars as especially appropriate to the Ninth of Ab , to the day of the destruction of the Temple, and to the eve of that fast-day comp. Contents Relation to Bereshit Rabbah 2 Jewish Encyclopedia bibliography 3 External links 4 The Proems The sources from which Yerushalmi drew must have been accessible to the author of Eichah Rabbah, which was certainly edited some time after the completion of the former, and which probably borrowed from it.

Related Articles