ABHIDHARMA KOSHA PDF

Main article: Eighteen dhatus The eighteen dhatus also include all validly knowable phenomena. The eighteen dhatus are an extension of the twelve ayatanas. These dhatus include the twelve ayatanas, and add to them the six types of consciousness that arise when there is contact between a sense organ and an object. It is distinguished from the mental factors or processes, usually listed as fifty-one or fifty-two, which are said to perceive the features of objects, while main mind perceives only their basic identity. Elements of ultimate reality The Abhidharma traditions define the basic elements or building blocks, or mental and emotional factors of ultimate reality.

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Main article: Eighteen dhatus The eighteen dhatus also include all validly knowable phenomena. The eighteen dhatus are an extension of the twelve ayatanas. These dhatus include the twelve ayatanas, and add to them the six types of consciousness that arise when there is contact between a sense organ and an object.

It is distinguished from the mental factors or processes, usually listed as fifty-one or fifty-two, which are said to perceive the features of objects, while main mind perceives only their basic identity. Elements of ultimate reality The Abhidharma traditions define the basic elements or building blocks, or mental and emotional factors of ultimate reality.

These basic elements are said to describe everything that truly is, in all of its particularity and variety. For example: The Theravada tradition of the Abhidhammattha-sangaha present of list seventy-two ultimate realities. The Sarvastidian tradition of the Abhidharma-kosha presents of list of seventy-five elements.

These lists are not intended as definitive " ontological " descriptions of ultimate reality, but rather as "maps" that indicate how our minds and bodies exist in the world in an interdependent manner. That is, these maps are taught to break down our grasping to a fixed sense of self.

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Abhidharma-kosa

Abhidharma: its origins and texts The early history of Buddhism in India is remarkably little known and the attempt to construct a consistent chronology of that history still engrosses the minds of contemporary scholars. The number eighteen, though, became conventional in Buddhist historiography for symbolic and mnemonic reasons Obeyesekere and, in fact, different Buddhist sources preserve divergent lists of schools which sum up to more than eighteen. These seven texts survive in full only in their ancient Chinese translations. These seven texts are preserved in Pali and all but the Yamaka have been translated into English.

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Abhidharmakośa Synopsis

Its author, Vasubandhu , who lived in the 4th or 5th century in the northwestern part of India, wrote the work while he was still a monk of the Sarvastivada Doctrine That All Is Real order, before he embraced Mahayana , on whose texts he was later to write a number of commentaries. As a Sarvastivada work the Abhidharmakosha is one of few surviving treatments of scholasticism not written in Pali and not produced by Theravadins, who follow the Pali canon. The product of both great erudition and considerable independence of thought, the Abhidharmakosha authoritatively completed the systematization of Sarvastivada doctrine. Translated into Chinese within a century or two of its creation, the Abhidharmakosha has been used in China, Japan, and Tibet both as a standard introduction to Hinayana Buddhism and as a great authority in matters of doctrine. The work has inspired numerous commentaries. It also provides scholars with a unique amount of information on the doctrinal differences between ancient Buddhist schools. The text is composed of stanzas of poetry plus the equivalent of 8, stanzas of prose commentary supplied by the author himself.

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