FIRST SYLLABUS ON XIANGQI PDF

Should I exchange a chariot for 2 horses? Is it worthwhile to sacrifice a horse for two elephants during attack? XQ is basically a decision making game. Every move, a decision is made with the ultimate goal of gaining advantage and winning the game.

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The vertical lines are known as files, and the horizontal lines are known as ranks. Centered at the first to third and eighth to tenth ranks of the board are two zones, each three points by three points, demarcated by two diagonal lines connecting opposite corners and intersecting at the center point.

Although the river provides a visual division between the two sides, only two pieces are affected by its presence: soldier pieces have an enhanced move after crossing the river, and elephant pieces cannot cross it. The starting points of the soldiers and cannons are usually, but not always, marked with small crosses. Rules Xiangqi is a common pastime in Chinese cities. The pieces start in the position shown in the diagram above. Which player moves first has varied throughout history and from one part of China to another.

Different xiangqi books advise either that the black or red side moves first. Generally, Red moves first in most modern tournaments. Pieces are generally not permitted to move through a point occupied by another piece. A piece can be moved onto a point occupied by an enemy piece, in which case the enemy piece is captured and removed from the board. A player cannot capture one of his own pieces. Pieces are never promoted converted into other pieces , although the soldier is able to move sideways after it crosses the river.

Almost all pieces capture using their normal moves, while the cannon has a special capture move described below. An instance of checkmate that assumes the cannon is safe and Black cannot block the check.

The horse is not needed for this checkmate. A check should be announced. Unlike chess, in which a stalemate is a draw, in xiangqi, a player with no legal moves left loses. In xiangqi, a player—often with material or positional disadvantage—may attempt to check or chase pieces in a way such that the moves fall in a cycle, forcing the opponent to draw the game. The following special rules are used to make it harder to draw the game by endless checking and chasing, regardless of whether the positions of the pieces are repeated or not: The side that perpetually checks with one piece or several pieces can be ruled to have lost unless he or she stops such checking.

The side that perpetually chases any one unprotected piece with one or more pieces, excluding generals and soldiers, will be ruled to have lost unless he or she stops such chasing. When neither side violates the rules and both persist in not making an alternate move, the game can be ruled as a draw.

When both sides violate the same rule at the same time and both persist in not making an alternate move, the game can be ruled as a draw. Different sets of rules set different limits on what is considered perpetual. For example, club xiangqi rules allow a player to check or chase six consecutive times using one piece, twelve times using two pieces, and eighteen times using three pieces before considering the action perpetual. The black pieces are marked with somewhat different characters from the corresponding red pieces.

In mainland China, most sets still use traditional Chinese characters as opposed to simplified Chinese characters. Modern pieces are usually plastic, though some sets are wooden, and more expensive sets may use jade. In more ancient times, many sets were simple unpainted woodcarvings; thus, to distinguish between pieces of the two sides, most corresponding pieces used characters that were similar but varied slightly. It is kept in the Henan Provincial Museum.

The general starts the game at the midpoint of the back edge, within the palace. The general may move and capture one point orthogonally , with the following exception.

The two generals may not face each other along the same file with no intervening pieces. In practice, this rule is only used to enforce checkmate.

The general may not leave the palace except when executing the flying general move. The advisors start on either side of the general. They move and capture one point diagonally and may not leave the palace, which confines them to five points on the board. The advisor is probably derived from the mantri in chaturanga , like the queen in Western chess.

They are located next to the advisors. The two elephants are often used to defend each other. The Chinese characters for "minister" and "elephant" are homophones in Mandarin Listen and both have alternative meanings as "appearance" or "image". However, both are referred to as elephants in the game. Horse The red horse may capture the black horse, but the black horse cannot capture the red horse because its movement is obstructed by another piece. Green moves are legal; Red ones are illegal because another piece is obstructing the movement of the horse.

Horses begin the game next to the elephants, on their outside flanks. The horse does not jump as the knight does in Western chess, and can be blocked by a piece located one point horizontally or vertically adjacent to it. The chariot moves and captures any distance orthogonally, but may not jump over intervening pieces. The chariots begin the game on the points at the corners of the board. The chariot is often considered to be the strongest piece in the game due to its freedom of movement and lack of restrictions.

The chariot is sometimes known as the rook by English-speaking players, since it is like the rook in Western chess. Each player has two cannons, which start on the row behind the soldiers, two points in front of the horses. Cannons move like chariots, any distance orthogonally without jumping, but can only capture by jumping a single piece, friend or foe, along the path of attack.

Any number of unoccupied spaces, including none, may exist between the cannon, screen, and the piece to be captured. Cannons can be exchanged for horses immediately from their starting positions. Soldiers begin the game located on every other point one row back from the edge of the river.

They move and capture by advancing one point. Once they have crossed the river, they may also move and capture one point horizontally. Approximate relative values of the pieces Piece Soldier before crossing the river 1 Soldier after crossing the river 2.

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First syllabus on Xiangqi

Centred at the first to third and eighth to tenth ranks of the board are two zones, each three points by three points, demarcated by two diagonal lines connecting opposite corners and intersecting at the centre point. Although the river provides a visual division between the two sides, only two pieces are affected by its presence: soldiers have an enhanced move after crossing the river, and elephants cannot cross it. The starting points of the soldiers and cannons are usually, but not always, marked with small crosses. Rules Xiangqi is a common pastime in Chinese cities. The pieces start in the position shown in the diagram above. Which player moves first has varied throughout history and from one part of China to another. Different xiangqi books advise either that the black or red side moves first.

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